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No Response to Teacher Question in Local Classroom

MOOSONEE: Not a single student raised their hand to answer a question in a grade 11 class this week at the local high school. During a lesson about plant cells, Steve Marson, a veteran biology teacher, asked, “Is the outside of a plant cell a cell wall or a cell membrane?” Following the question the class remained silent for a tense ten seconds before Marson was forced to provide the answer himself.
During the difficult ordeal, six students stared at the teacher and blinked, one rustled some papers, four stared at the clock, one doodled, and another started to sneeze but it faded away.

“I just had no idea,” remarked one student that successfully hid his emotional reaction to the crisis. He shrugged. “I knew he’d tell us the answer after waiting a bit. And he did. It’s wall.”

This surprising turn of events has some wondering if our education policy is heading in the right direction. Jim Plourde, a student in the class remarked, “He asked a question? Oh. I didn’t notice.”

Another student, with only one eye visible through his long bangs, and was sitting closer to the back of the room when the incident occurred, said, “I was just hoping he wouldn’t notice me on my phone.”

Marson did his best to put on a brave face amidst a situation no teacher can be truly prepared for. He remarked, “Uh, it happens all the time. Sometimes students don’t know the answer. That’s kind of what I’m here for.”

As expected, students are noticeably shaken and are doing whatever they can to stop reliving the event over and over in their minds. “Was I in that class? I can’t remember,” said one grade 12 student.

Update: HSBN has made the startling discovery that the school counselor was not made aware of the situation. School administration has not responded to our request for a comment, and calls to Marson’s family to request an interview were not returned.

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